Gustavo: “Fear is not a factor.” (3/3)

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  Psssst: This is the follow-up of Gustavo’ stories. Watch the video and read part 2 if you missed it.   «To take hundred or two hundred people, ten or fifty people on a plane is almost the same thing. As long as it’s someone strange that doesn’t know us and that is trusting us, the company and the service, the relation is almost the same, I guess. Of course there’s more pressure when there are more heads turned to me. But it’s a pressure that we put on ourselves to perform at our best. Not necessarily the pressure from outside, but the one we put on ourselves to keep up with the demands of our job, to do our best so everyone can arrive home safely. In terms of statistics, as there are a lot of planes flying all the time, civil…

Gustavo: “My life is full of failures.” (2/3)

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  Gustavo was featured on last week’s video that got great response on social media. After 24 hours of being posted, it was already our second most watched video – how cool is that? If you missed it, check it here. Gustavo had a candid talk with us about his successes and failures, his passions and experiences. We’re sharing some of his words on today’s post.   «I lived around Peniche and I used to go to a normal school, a public school. My mother had just moved there at the time, she is a teacher. So, I haven’t grown up there and every child takes a while to feel included in a new school. Usually all the other kids were born there, grew up there, are from there. I was a bit of an outsider, a bit different. I…

The stories of Gustavo (1/3)

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  Even though Gustavo is living in the United States of America, we met him in Portugal. On a dirt road, in the middle of Alentejo, we heard stories that talk about perseverance, friendship, courage and will to live. The funny thing is that Gustavo told us we shouldn’t focus on him and his life. He said he was just a normal guy who had nothing special or relevant to share with us. We are absolutely sure that, after watching the following video, you will have a hard time agreeing with him. (The video has subtitles in English for those who don’t understand Portuguese – you just need to click on CC.)     Psssst: We’re sharing more about Gustavo on part 2 and part 3.   Apesar de viver nos Estados Unidos da América, foi em Portugal que nós nos…

Teresa: “Things have to give me more pleasure than work.” (3/3)

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  Psssst: This is the follow-up of Teresa’ story. Check the video and part 2 to know more about it…   «I’ve always wrote a lot. But usually poetry. Some crappy poetry because it was a soul’s purge. Even at work and all, since I was a kid. I had diaries and little notebooks. I would get home and write some nonsense and that was it. Then I looked as good as new. And those poems started adding up… I’ve always loved to write. It is, in fact, very therapeutical. I had just got out of a relationship, during a changing period, and I needed to take a stock. Writing a book was not even something that occurred to me deliberately. One night I was sitting at the computador,  during a sleepless period, and I started. It was a great experience. A…

Teresa: “During a war it’s more black and white.” (2/3)

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  When we presented the craziness idea of making a video that would portray a bit of Teresa, we weren’t expecting her to react in such an enthusiastic way. But, after all, that’s Teresa. In an open, honest and casual way, she spoke about several aspects of her life, always punctuating the conversation with an humoristic traits. Today we transcribed some of Teresa’s experiences as a humanitarian worker for United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).    «My father thought it was inconceivable for me to go to Malawi, to the middle of nowhere. But I did. I did and I loved it. I started in Malawi, where there was a tremendous influx of Mozambican refugees. I had a series of camps (for refugees). Hundreds of thousands of people under my responsibility. There were all confined to camps, but everything was very well organized. It was a…

The stories of Teresa (1/3)

posted in: anygivenperson, Video | 2

  I’ve known Teresa since I was born. She has always been present, somehow, in my family. Surprisingly, however, it was not until I read her book (I was already a grown-up) that I realized just how great and rich Teresa’s life has been, beyond the cups of tea at my aunts’ houses. Cups of tea were also what we shared together during our long conversation. We talked about a bit of everything, switching from great laughs (Teresa’s sense of humor is priceless) and reflections on things as trivial as the human condition, without even noticing the passing of time. We will be publishing some of Teresa’s stories. Stories of her daily life. Her memories. Her thoughts. Her learnt lessons. Her life choices. Her house. Her work in wars in Africa and the Balkans. Her colorful and vibrant painting. Her poetry and prose. (The video has…

Maria and Lucas: “Gender doesn’t have to be a rule.” (3/3)

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  Psssst: This is the last post of this story. We’ve posted a video and part 2 before this – take a look to find out more. «I think many people, when having babies, do things the way things have always been done and they think: “That’s the way you do this…” and they reproduce them without reflecting on them. Jonathan and I are social scientists and our job is to reflect on why people do things and what happens when people do things in a certain way. When we had a baby, of course it was important for us to reflect on why we do certain things and what we want to teach Lucas. Both of us work on gender as part of our jobs. Both of us study the ways people’s ideas about femininity and masculinity affect children. One simple thing is that…

Maria and Lucas: “Each of us gets to do their own thing.” (2/3)

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  After letting you overcome the cuteness of baby Lucas’ images seen on the last video, we’re posting some more of his family stories. Maria, Jonathan and Lucas are a bicultural family living in the United Kingdom. Through Maria’s words, you can get to know some of their views, struggles and hopes.   «For language to be part of who you are, then you have to have emotional connections to it. So I think that the challenge and also the beauty of raising a bilingual child is to have both languages present. Not just in everyday conversation to describe things, to name things, to teach things, but also to have the emotional connection to the language and to have things that you feel in that language. Lucas really likes the word “Viva!”. “Viva!” is hurray. He loves it. It makes…

The stories of Maria and Lucas (1/3)

posted in: anygivenperson, Video | 3

  We’re so happy to finally share our first anygivenperson. That title is actually not very accurate because these are not the stories of a single person. You will be meeting Maria and her baby Lucas. She is Portuguese and Lucas is half Portuguese and half Scottish, because his father, Jonathan, is from Scotland. These stories belong to this family and were told by Maria in one of her trips to Portugal. She talked to us about what it is like to be a migrant mother, the challenges of bilingualism, their views on gender and many other subjects. We squeezed part of their stories into this video but, inevitably, so much more was left out that we decided to split these stories into two different posts, as we did with the stories of A Mercearia – Atelier Criativo (I guess…